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Our Story


  • Our History - Pt 3
    Kim and Kyle working on opening day.

    Once the cart was completed we had a need to take on some more help to complete our project. Kim was in school, and had a heavy load. This is where Kyle and Elise came in. Kyle took a large portion of the load to register and license the business. He had to learn a lot of the laws, while coordinating with a business owner in the third world. I would get quite frustrated at times at the difficulty of doing things from Iraq. Kyle’s ability to stay cool in the face of my frustration is a testament to the length and depth of the Atlantic Ocean. Oceans and land masses aside though Kyle was a great friend and gave a lot of his time and energy to getting the cart open, and I’m forever grateful to him and his friendship.


    Me and Kim at Disneyland while I was on leave. I know, goofy face paint, but after a year of dealing with bureaucracy you begin to redefine what's stupid.


    A few months ago we had an interesting adventure. The Curryer was not the first name we settled on. We originally had decided on Curryosity. One day Kim texted me with a page on Facebook. The page was for a food stall in Provo named...Curryosity. They had logos, uniforms, and very specific dates for when their name was conceived. Accusations were flung, anger was manifest. Hands were tied and there was really nothing we could do. In the end it became fairly clear that this was simply serendipity. A fantastic chance we both decided on the same name at the same place, but chance nonetheless. We conceded, a business lesson in name registration learned, and chose The Curryer, which we’re very pleased with.

    Designing the logo was another challenge. Kim and I tried to come up with a logo that would represent our business worthily, but we didn’t really have the graphic design experience. Fortunately my best friend married Becca Foster. Becca Foster is a graphic designer who designed us a logo, without us even asking, and made it work for us. All this without being able to speak to me directly.

    So at times I feel a little helpless, watching our cart grow from a distance. It’s a little like having a baby born while deployed to war. Well, without the human baby and tenderness of life. But watching this project from a distance, through pictures, can be hard sometimes. I want to work on my cart, I want to be out on the street selling our product and meeting our customers. I can’t do that, I have a mission to do. The Iraqi’s depend on us and the training we give them to hope for a better future. I have to stay here for just a little longer and give these people the best, but I’ll be home soon, and then I can be with Kim and my loved ones, and our new fledgling business.


    Posted Jun 2, 2011, 9:24 AM by Dustin Romero
  • Our History, Pt. 2

               In the last blog entry I told the story of how The Curryer came into vision. From the early phases of ideation to getting serious in the face of an impending deployment to Iraq. This entry is going to share some of the history of what was done while I’ve been “downrange” in Iraq.


    The food cart under construction, the tandoor oven is attached on the right.


    The deployment came and we purchased a an old carnival van to convert into a food truck, but Salt Lake City laws weren’t that friendly and running a truck with me in Iraq would have been far too difficult so we started looking at carts. After some research we decided that we would focus on three things. Good naan, good rice, and good curry. To do this we needed a good rice cooker, so we didn’t have to rely on steam beds, and a tandoor oven. Doing this was a different story.

          The internet is a modern miracle. Here’s a laundry list of just some of the things we’ve been able to do over a continent. We were able to acquire a cart, hire someone to modify it, purchase a tandoor oven and commercial rice cooker, have them installed into the food cart up to code, pass the health inspection, license our business, set up our accounting, hire employees and develop a menu, all from Iraq. Making purchases and transferring money to my dad and other friends and strangers took a lot of coordination with no face time to simplify it.

     Kim working on the Menu

    the Peacock I surprised her with on Christmas

    me, hanging out in Iraq


    Don’t let me deceive you though, doing all this from a war zone was not easy. Sometimes I would get discouraged. Our internet was bad. So bad that I would go days without contact. I recall a time that I was juggling calls with health department inspectors, my builder and the tandoor manufacturer on getting the oven approved. my internet was so slow I could barely load my email most of the time, much less make Skype phone calls. My heart was beating as I desperately made calls back and forth with choppy conversations and broken messages. Even now, I’m writing this history from an internet cafe with 30 min limits because a sandstorm took down my normal internet. My dad was a huge help during this time. He did a lot to get things in motion and work with my builder. He’s a model father in his dedication to his children.


    Of course, in the interested of time there are a lot of details that have been left out. I’ve been extremely blessed in many areas that have made it possible to do what I’ve done here, and even if the business were to fail completely I would still be grateful for the opportunity (although initial sales seem promising, so we might just pull this off). Keep up with us here on our webpage or on Facebook for the next part of this history, where I’ll talk about the actual opening and the team we’ve put together.


    Cheers!



    Posted Jun 2, 2011, 9:21 AM by Dustin Romero
  • Our History, Pt. 1
    Part 1 - Part 2 - Part 3
        


      

















            
            I have to confess. We’re not chefs, we’re not successful business veterans. We weren’t raised in India. We’re just a few locals who wanted to make an honest living with something we could feel good about. I want to share our story to give people an idea of who we are, where we come from and what it's taken to get us to the stage we're in now.

            Our adventure started with a conversation a few years ago about food carts between me and some friends of mine, but the real meat of the story began in Salt Lake's own Bombay House. When Kim and I had been dating for about a month I decided to take her to one of my favorite eateries for one of our date nights. I have to confess, I was really just trying to impress her with my cultural prowess, but I also new she'd like the complexity of the flavors. I was right. She instantly fell in love.
            
      
          Before we even decided to open a food cart we decided that we wanted to learn how to do one thing really well. Honestly we wanted to get good at a lot of things, but we thought it would be cool to get especially good at one thing...or maybe a few, at least ;). We decided to specialize in Indian food. We did a little research and cooked Indian Cuisine for a few parties and get together’s. We weren't really trying to take ourselves too seriously, but when I got my orders to deploy to Iraq for a year I couldn't help it, I needed to figure things out for the future.


    Kim getting a Henna tatoo at an Indian Festival

        I thought I was going to be going to Monterrey, California to the Defense Language Institute to be trained in Arabic as an Army linguist. I wasn't ignorant to how the Army worked, so when the call came changing those plans I wasn't surprised, although I was glad for the chance to serve. When I realized that I would making decent money, with nothing to spend it on I started thinking about a food cart. I brought the idea up to Kim, and she was enthusiastic.

    We didn’t initially rest on Indian Cuisine. We mulled over hot dogs, hamburgers and barbecue, and those are all awesome street foods, but we love being unique. We did exhaustive searches and scoured the city (no we didn't, haha), we didn't find one single Indian food cart, at all. Not even anything close, so we decided we would go with that. 


    Me In Iraq

    The story of course doesn’t end here, I’ll put up another post soon with how we developed our menu, purchased our cart and dealt with the beginning portion of my deployment. It wasn't easy, I want everyone to know I've enjoyed the process, but I want to give an idea of just how difficult it can be to start and run a business from Iraq. Check back soon, or "Like" on on Facebook (facebook.com/TheCurryer) for updates. Thanks for reading, Cheers! ~Dustin

    Posted Jun 2, 2011, 9:21 AM by Dustin Romero
  • Bastram wa Beudd
    Under pressure from an aggressive Chaldean interpreter I decided to make a traditional Iraqi breakfast. "Bastrama wa Beudd" or Eggs and Pastrami. We got the bastrama (pastrami) from one of the other interpreters, or "terps" who likes to cook. We picked up the eggs from and Iraqi shop on base, the tomatoes from the chow hall and if you don't know where we get the samoon bread then you'll have to go to our blog on Making Samoon.

    It was a fun activity and it brought our little community together for a morning Eid Al-Fitr feast. In case you didn't know, Eid is an Islamic holliday that lasts for about a week, sometimes longer here. It's a celebration at the end of Haj, or the pilgrimage to Mecca. It's a holiday in comparison in importance to Christmas for Westerners.

    See below for the recipe!








    Recipe


    Ingredients:
    Bastrama
    Sliced tomatoes
    Eggs
    Some kind of bread

    Bastrama is a halal (in accordance with Islamic law), beef based sausage, basically beef pastrami. It has LOADS of garlic, so be prepared and don't eat this if you're about to go socialize!

    The basics of eggs and bastrama are that you fry sliced bastrama in a pan the crack eggs over it, fry it, then slice and dish it onto plates covering it with cooked tomato slices. If you really want to be fancy you will use some samoon bread split like a pita and stuff it like a sandwich. Delicious!














    Posted May 14, 2011, 9:08 AM by Dustin Romero
  • Making Samoon
    Below you can see a slideshow of the pictures we took. Compare this process to what we do with our tandoor oven!

    We made a visit to the Iraqi chow hall today to get some fresh samoon bread. We frequent this place almost everyday since we are in the Iraqi compound so often. These are the cooks who work in the bakery. They want a soccer ball, and for us to put a team together so they can spank us.

    The bread they make is called samoon. It is an Iraqi leavened flat bread made with yeast, flour, sugar and salt. Some bakers add other ingredients to improve taste and quality. The bread is cooked in a brick oven on a piping hot stone surface.

    This bread is similar to the naan bread that we make on the cart. It is cooked at high temperatures which gives it a crisp crust, yet tender mailable crumb (inside part of bread). It is also cooked thin like naan is. The difference being that naan is stuck to the side of a tandoor, and although the brick oven maintains a very hot temperature of about 500 degrees Fahrenheit, a tandoor oven maintains a blistering temperature of around 900 degrees Fahrenheit. 

    The bread is absolutely delicious. We eat it piping hot and enjoy it with our meals, or spread with a topping make from mixing a thick, almost butter like cream with date syrup.
    The process is as follows. 
    1. Ingredients are mixed in a large mixer that blends the dough and gives it it's initial knead. 
    2. The dough is then transfered to a counter where it is rolled and cut into individual pieces.
    3. The dough is that shaped and stretched into oblong pieces and places on a raising tray.
    4. The trays are then stacked to allow the dough to rise.
    5. Trays are moved to another person how flattens raised dough and hands the tray to the baker
    6. The baker then places flattened dough onto the peel (the giant wood spatula thing)
    7. The baker loads the bread into the brick oven and cooks for about 5 minutes
    8. The bread is that removed quickly and thrown backwards allowing it to cascade into the waiting bin
    9. Some bread is then stolen by greedy marauding Americans
    10. Most bread is then served on the chow line to hungry Iraqi soldiers.

    Posted May 14, 2011, 9:09 AM by Dustin Romero
Showing posts 1 - 5 of 8. View more »

Our History - Pt 3

posted Jun 2, 2011, 9:01 AM by Dustin Romero   [ updated Jun 2, 2011, 9:24 AM ]

Kim and Kyle working on opening day.

Once the cart was completed we had a need to take on some more help to complete our project. Kim was in school, and had a heavy load. This is where Kyle and Elise came in. Kyle took a large portion of the load to register and license the business. He had to learn a lot of the laws, while coordinating with a business owner in the third world. I would get quite frustrated at times at the difficulty of doing things from Iraq. Kyle’s ability to stay cool in the face of my frustration is a testament to the length and depth of the Atlantic Ocean. Oceans and land masses aside though Kyle was a great friend and gave a lot of his time and energy to getting the cart open, and I’m forever grateful to him and his friendship.


Me and Kim at Disneyland while I was on leave. I know, goofy face paint, but after a year of dealing with bureaucracy you begin to redefine what's stupid.


A few months ago we had an interesting adventure. The Curryer was not the first name we settled on. We originally had decided on Curryosity. One day Kim texted me with a page on Facebook. The page was for a food stall in Provo named...Curryosity. They had logos, uniforms, and very specific dates for when their name was conceived. Accusations were flung, anger was manifest. Hands were tied and there was really nothing we could do. In the end it became fairly clear that this was simply serendipity. A fantastic chance we both decided on the same name at the same place, but chance nonetheless. We conceded, a business lesson in name registration learned, and chose The Curryer, which we’re very pleased with.

Designing the logo was another challenge. Kim and I tried to come up with a logo that would represent our business worthily, but we didn’t really have the graphic design experience. Fortunately my best friend married Becca Foster. Becca Foster is a graphic designer who designed us a logo, without us even asking, and made it work for us. All this without being able to speak to me directly.

So at times I feel a little helpless, watching our cart grow from a distance. It’s a little like having a baby born while deployed to war. Well, without the human baby and tenderness of life. But watching this project from a distance, through pictures, can be hard sometimes. I want to work on my cart, I want to be out on the street selling our product and meeting our customers. I can’t do that, I have a mission to do. The Iraqi’s depend on us and the training we give them to hope for a better future. I have to stay here for just a little longer and give these people the best, but I’ll be home soon, and then I can be with Kim and my loved ones, and our new fledgling business.


Our History, Pt. 2

posted May 22, 2011, 11:23 AM by Dustin Romero   [ updated Jun 2, 2011, 9:21 AM ]


           In the last blog entry I told the story of how The Curryer came into vision. From the early phases of ideation to getting serious in the face of an impending deployment to Iraq. This entry is going to share some of the history of what was done while I’ve been “downrange” in Iraq.


The food cart under construction, the tandoor oven is attached on the right.


The deployment came and we purchased a an old carnival van to convert into a food truck, but Salt Lake City laws weren’t that friendly and running a truck with me in Iraq would have been far too difficult so we started looking at carts. After some research we decided that we would focus on three things. Good naan, good rice, and good curry. To do this we needed a good rice cooker, so we didn’t have to rely on steam beds, and a tandoor oven. Doing this was a different story.

      The internet is a modern miracle. Here’s a laundry list of just some of the things we’ve been able to do over a continent. We were able to acquire a cart, hire someone to modify it, purchase a tandoor oven and commercial rice cooker, have them installed into the food cart up to code, pass the health inspection, license our business, set up our accounting, hire employees and develop a menu, all from Iraq. Making purchases and transferring money to my dad and other friends and strangers took a lot of coordination with no face time to simplify it.

 Kim working on the Menu

the Peacock I surprised her with on Christmas

me, hanging out in Iraq


Don’t let me deceive you though, doing all this from a war zone was not easy. Sometimes I would get discouraged. Our internet was bad. So bad that I would go days without contact. I recall a time that I was juggling calls with health department inspectors, my builder and the tandoor manufacturer on getting the oven approved. my internet was so slow I could barely load my email most of the time, much less make Skype phone calls. My heart was beating as I desperately made calls back and forth with choppy conversations and broken messages. Even now, I’m writing this history from an internet cafe with 30 min limits because a sandstorm took down my normal internet. My dad was a huge help during this time. He did a lot to get things in motion and work with my builder. He’s a model father in his dedication to his children.


Of course, in the interested of time there are a lot of details that have been left out. I’ve been extremely blessed in many areas that have made it possible to do what I’ve done here, and even if the business were to fail completely I would still be grateful for the opportunity (although initial sales seem promising, so we might just pull this off). Keep up with us here on our webpage or on Facebook for the next part of this history, where I’ll talk about the actual opening and the team we’ve put together.


Cheers!



Our History, Pt. 1

posted May 15, 2011, 6:41 AM by Dustin Romero   [ updated Jun 2, 2011, 9:21 AM ]

Part 1 - Part 2 - Part 3
    


  

















        
        I have to confess. We’re not chefs, we’re not successful business veterans. We weren’t raised in India. We’re just a few locals who wanted to make an honest living with something we could feel good about. I want to share our story to give people an idea of who we are, where we come from and what it's taken to get us to the stage we're in now.

        Our adventure started with a conversation a few years ago about food carts between me and some friends of mine, but the real meat of the story began in Salt Lake's own Bombay House. When Kim and I had been dating for about a month I decided to take her to one of my favorite eateries for one of our date nights. I have to confess, I was really just trying to impress her with my cultural prowess, but I also new she'd like the complexity of the flavors. I was right. She instantly fell in love.
        
  
      Before we even decided to open a food cart we decided that we wanted to learn how to do one thing really well. Honestly we wanted to get good at a lot of things, but we thought it would be cool to get especially good at one thing...or maybe a few, at least ;). We decided to specialize in Indian food. We did a little research and cooked Indian Cuisine for a few parties and get together’s. We weren't really trying to take ourselves too seriously, but when I got my orders to deploy to Iraq for a year I couldn't help it, I needed to figure things out for the future.


Kim getting a Henna tatoo at an Indian Festival

    I thought I was going to be going to Monterrey, California to the Defense Language Institute to be trained in Arabic as an Army linguist. I wasn't ignorant to how the Army worked, so when the call came changing those plans I wasn't surprised, although I was glad for the chance to serve. When I realized that I would making decent money, with nothing to spend it on I started thinking about a food cart. I brought the idea up to Kim, and she was enthusiastic.

We didn’t initially rest on Indian Cuisine. We mulled over hot dogs, hamburgers and barbecue, and those are all awesome street foods, but we love being unique. We did exhaustive searches and scoured the city (no we didn't, haha), we didn't find one single Indian food cart, at all. Not even anything close, so we decided we would go with that. 


Me In Iraq

The story of course doesn’t end here, I’ll put up another post soon with how we developed our menu, purchased our cart and dealt with the beginning portion of my deployment. It wasn't easy, I want everyone to know I've enjoyed the process, but I want to give an idea of just how difficult it can be to start and run a business from Iraq. Check back soon, or "Like" on on Facebook (facebook.com/TheCurryer) for updates. Thanks for reading, Cheers! ~Dustin

Bastram wa Beudd

posted Nov 22, 2010, 9:01 AM by Dustin Romero   [ updated May 14, 2011, 9:08 AM by Dustin Romero ]

Under pressure from an aggressive Chaldean interpreter I decided to make a traditional Iraqi breakfast. "Bastrama wa Beudd" or Eggs and Pastrami. We got the bastrama (pastrami) from one of the other interpreters, or "terps" who likes to cook. We picked up the eggs from and Iraqi shop on base, the tomatoes from the chow hall and if you don't know where we get the samoon bread then you'll have to go to our blog on Making Samoon.

It was a fun activity and it brought our little community together for a morning Eid Al-Fitr feast. In case you didn't know, Eid is an Islamic holliday that lasts for about a week, sometimes longer here. It's a celebration at the end of Haj, or the pilgrimage to Mecca. It's a holiday in comparison in importance to Christmas for Westerners.

See below for the recipe!








Recipe


Ingredients:
Bastrama
Sliced tomatoes
Eggs
Some kind of bread

Bastrama is a halal (in accordance with Islamic law), beef based sausage, basically beef pastrami. It has LOADS of garlic, so be prepared and don't eat this if you're about to go socialize!

The basics of eggs and bastrama are that you fry sliced bastrama in a pan the crack eggs over it, fry it, then slice and dish it onto plates covering it with cooked tomato slices. If you really want to be fancy you will use some samoon bread split like a pita and stuff it like a sandwich. Delicious!














Making Samoon

posted Nov 7, 2010, 12:14 PM by Dustin Romero   [ updated May 14, 2011, 9:09 AM by Dustin Romero ]

Below you can see a slideshow of the pictures we took. Compare this process to what we do with our tandoor oven!

We made a visit to the Iraqi chow hall today to get some fresh samoon bread. We frequent this place almost everyday since we are in the Iraqi compound so often. These are the cooks who work in the bakery. They want a soccer ball, and for us to put a team together so they can spank us.

The bread they make is called samoon. It is an Iraqi leavened flat bread made with yeast, flour, sugar and salt. Some bakers add other ingredients to improve taste and quality. The bread is cooked in a brick oven on a piping hot stone surface.

This bread is similar to the naan bread that we make on the cart. It is cooked at high temperatures which gives it a crisp crust, yet tender mailable crumb (inside part of bread). It is also cooked thin like naan is. The difference being that naan is stuck to the side of a tandoor, and although the brick oven maintains a very hot temperature of about 500 degrees Fahrenheit, a tandoor oven maintains a blistering temperature of around 900 degrees Fahrenheit. 

The bread is absolutely delicious. We eat it piping hot and enjoy it with our meals, or spread with a topping make from mixing a thick, almost butter like cream with date syrup.
The process is as follows. 
  1. Ingredients are mixed in a large mixer that blends the dough and gives it it's initial knead. 
  2. The dough is then transfered to a counter where it is rolled and cut into individual pieces.
  3. The dough is that shaped and stretched into oblong pieces and places on a raising tray.
  4. The trays are then stacked to allow the dough to rise.
  5. Trays are moved to another person how flattens raised dough and hands the tray to the baker
  6. The baker then places flattened dough onto the peel (the giant wood spatula thing)
  7. The baker loads the bread into the brick oven and cooks for about 5 minutes
  8. The bread is that removed quickly and thrown backwards allowing it to cascade into the waiting bin
  9. Some bread is then stolen by greedy marauding Americans
  10. Most bread is then served on the chow line to hungry Iraqi soldiers.

Making Ice Cream in the Desert

posted Oct 21, 2010, 11:38 AM by Dustin Romero   [ updated May 14, 2011, 9:09 AM by Dustin Romero ]

 
 
1. Ask the Air Force intelligence officer why they have an ice cream maker. Since no one else can make desert ice cream, he'll give it to you.

2. Steel banana milk from the chow hall.

3. Find salt outside an abandoned base housing unit. Leave the cans of coconut milk.

4.Pick up free ice from the ice pick-up location.

5. Pour banana milk into ice cream maker

6. Crank for 30 minutes

7. Cut up water bottles to use as ice cream cones.

8. ENJOY!

What does this have to do with curry? NOTHING! Lol, just bored. I'm waiting on pictures of the cart. Fingers crossed it's completed today.
 
 

My Sandbox Garden

posted Oct 8, 2010, 7:19 AM by Dustin Romero   [ updated May 14, 2011, 9:09 AM by Dustin Romero ]

Actually I think that clay would better describe it, but I did mix some sand in too. I have planted though, and I've seen my first sprouts coming up. Like my experience with food, it takes some creativity to make things work.


To start I got the seeds from a contact in a local shop that one of the interpreters knew. We were really hoping for tomatoes, and cucumbers, but they are out of season. We were given watermelon, cantaloupe, beans, and seeds that looked like cantaloupe, but were pink. I planted some of the seeds in old plastic drawers I found laying around the abandoned part of our housing village. The rest of the seeds are planted in water bottles that I cut a door into and punched little drain holes in the bottom.


My next project is to finish my garden beds. I found some old unused sand bags that I'm using as the edge of my garden bed. I then "acquired" some HESCO barriers (google it), the ones I...found...were the little ones, about two feet high, and two feet wide cubes. The plan that our interpreter and I have devised is to take the HESCO's appart and use them as a fence to keep critters out and as walls to cover the garden with clear plastic, like a greenhouse.


Our biggest problem right now is getting a shovel, of all things. We went and asked the KBR contractor in the office that runs our housing village. I'm not making this up, mind you, he told us that they weren't allowed to have shovels, since they belonged to a tool classification that they had not been trained on. Not trained to use a shovel. Right. Our tax dollars at work, thanks KBR.




M*A*S*H Al-Iraq

posted Oct 7, 2010, 10:55 AM by Dustin Romero   [ updated May 14, 2011, 9:09 AM by Dustin Romero ]

I still can't believe that Kim and I decided to open the food cart while I'm in Iraq. It's been fun, but sometimes it's a crap lot of work. So I decided to take a little leisure today and make some curry here from Iraq.

Acquiring the ingredients was surprisingly easy to do. It took some patience, but all the food was available at the chow hall. It took some time to build a spice rack, but all the spices are laid out on the serving line, and I put them in emptied and cleaned out cranberry juice bottles. Most of the other food items came off the serving line and salad bar.

A neighbor, one of the interpreters, had an old hot plate that he wasn't using and when he heard I was interested in cooking gave it to me. Another soldier was cleaning out an unused room and found a pile of pots and pans. He also had heard I was looking to cook, so he notified me of the utensils. I still don't have a fridge, but that's been an adventure all on it's own.

Overall the food was excellent. One of the best meals I've had since deploying. Second only to perhaps the food that was at the Iraqi meet and great, they served three lambs and a goat. I was the lowest ranking soldier there. There were several generals. I kept quiet, by filling my mouth with food instead of words.

I like the flavor that the V8 added, I'll probably use it again. Next time I'll keep to a particular theme and accent a particular flavor, this curry was a little busy. It was also runny, but I was hungry and didn't want to wait for the sauce to condense, besides, my hot plate isn't the greatest for a low simmer. The flavor wasn't as bold as I'm used to with my curries, but then the ingredients weren't fresh either. But considering where I'm at I feel that I've done pretty well. It was a satisfying meal, and one I actually felt better after eating.


This is my humble kitchen. It doubles as a bedroom, office, living room, study, closet and hallway!



These are all the ingredients I used. For the spices: Curry Powder, Cayanne pepper, garlic granules, powdered ginger. Olive oil, onions, bell peppers and jalapeños. The main ingredient was chicken and potatoes. The sauce was V8 juice.



These are the spices I used laid out to quickly put into the dish in order.




I fried the curry powder in olive oil to try to eek out a little bit more flavor from the stale spices.




Next in, onions, bell peppers and jalapeños.




I rigged up a double boiled to try to take the sting off of my rugged on heat setting hot plate.



Fortunately, except the occasional photo shoot, I have no real need any more for this linked ammo. :)



Thanks for reading!
Cheers!
Dustin




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